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All Aboard! The Story of Joshua Lionel Cowen & His Lionel Train Company
Used, good condition. By Ron Hollander. Softcover, 253 pages.
$10.00
American Locomotives A Pictorial Record of Steam Power 1900-1950
Used, good condition. By Edwin P. Alexander. Hardcover, 256 pages.

AMERICAN LOCOMOTIVES A PICTORIAL RECORD OF STEAM POWER, 1900-1950By EDWIN P. ALEXANDER HERE IS THE PICTORIAL HISTORY OF AMERICAN RAILROAD MOTIVE POWER AS IT DEVELOPED FROM 1900 - a continuation of the story begun with Iron Horses. From the first Atlantic and Prairie types, fifty years of progress are shown by well over · 100 full-page plates, together with diagrams and descriptions. The locomotive illustrations have been carefully chosen to show milestones in improved designs and for photogenic interest. Every major railroad is represented. Pictured are the engines of the early years of the century, the first Mallets, the "firsts" of many new designs, up through the decades to the 500-ton monsters which are gradually being supplanted by Diesels. Considering today's trends in motive power, this might well be the swan song of the steam locomotive as most people know it. Here the outstanding representatives in locomotive development over the past half-century are gathered together in one volume - a must for anyone interested in railroads.

Illustrated with over 125 plates.
$10.00
By Rail to the Boardwalk
Used, good condition. By Richard M. Gladulich. Hardcover, 331 pages.

For decades Atlantic City and the South Jer­sey coast reigned as America's summer playground and in the pre-superhighway era.

It was not only fashionable but a matter of neces­sity to go by train. Thus, South Jersey was a battleground for the tourist and commuter dollar. The chief combatants were the mighty Pennsylvania Railroad and its subsidiary, the West Jersey & Seashore, and the rival Reading and its Atlantic City Railroad af­filiate. They fought fiercely with fine trains, fre­quent schedules, high-speed trackage and faster - ever faster - timings. Steam was king, and the Reading's distinctive Camelbacks ruled the rails. Of course, it had to end. In the Depression, the PRR and Reading joined together to form the Pennsylvania-Reading-Seashore Lines to do bat­tle with the automobile and eliminate duplicate services. But the downhill slide continued, with only World War II providing a temporary lull in the decline. PRSL carried commuters, too, many of them in the WJ&S' venerable third-rail electric cars. But the electrics were an early victim of the au­tomobile, and with deficits skyrocketing, Atlan­tic City no longer a lure for tourists, the PRSL finally threw in the towel. It ended with a few, forlorn Budd cars plying the once-manicured trackage, a great railroad plant now redundant.
$35.00
Chicago's Passenger Trains
Used, good condition. By Robert P. Olmsted. Hardcover, 136 pages.
$18.00
Portrait of the Rails
Used, good condition. By Don Ball, Jr. Hardcover, 295 pages.

In hundreds of stirring photographs, this book chronicles America's most colorful industrial transition: the change-over of the railroad industry from the power of steam to the throbbing pulse of the diesel.

$30.00
Railroading Coast to Coast
Used, good condition. By S. Kip Farrington, Jr. Hardcover, 305 pages.

For decades Atlantic City and the South Jer­sey coast reigned as America's summer playground and in the pre-superhighway era.

It was not only fashionable but a matter of neces­sity to go by train. Thus, South Jersey was a battleground for the tourist and commuter dollar. The chief combatants were the mighty Pennsylvania Railroad and its subsidiary, the West Jersey & Seashore, and the rival Reading and its Atlantic City Railroad af­filiate. They fought fiercely with fine trains, fre­quent schedules, high-speed trackage and faster - ever faster - timings. Steam was king, and the Reading's distinctive Camelbacks ruled the rails. Of course, it had to end. In the Depression, the PRR and Reading joined together to form the Pennsylvania-Reading-Seashore Lines to do bat­tle with the automobile and eliminate duplicate services. But the downhill slide continued, with only World War II providing a temporary lull in the decline. PRSL carried commuters, too, many of them in the WJ&S' venerable third-rail electric cars. But the electrics were an early victim of the au­tomobile, and with deficits skyrocketing, Atlan­tic City no longer a lure for tourists, the PRSL finally threw in the towel. It ended with a few, forlorn Budd cars plying the once-manicured trackage, a great railroad plant now redundant.
$10.00
The History of the Lehigh Valley Railroad: The Route of the Black Diamond
Used, good condition. By Robert F. Archer. Hardcover, 371 pages.

For decades Atlantic City and the South Jer­sey coast reigned as America's summer playground and in the pre-superhighway era.

It was not only fashionable but a matter of neces­sity to go by train. Thus, South Jersey was a battleground for the tourist and commuter dollar. The chief combatants were the mighty Pennsylvania Railroad and its subsidiary, the West Jersey & Seashore, and the rival Reading and its Atlantic City Railroad af­filiate. They fought fiercely with fine trains, fre­quent schedules, high-speed trackage and faster - ever faster - timings. Steam was king, and the Reading's distinctive Camelbacks ruled the rails. Of course, it had to end. In the Depression, the PRR and Reading joined together to form the Pennsylvania-Reading-Seashore Lines to do bat­tle with the automobile and eliminate duplicate services. But the downhill slide continued, with only World War II providing a temporary lull in the decline. PRSL carried commuters, too, many of them in the WJ&S' venerable third-rail electric cars. But the electrics were an early victim of the au­tomobile, and with deficits skyrocketing, Atlan­tic City no longer a lure for tourists, the PRSL finally threw in the towel. It ended with a few, forlorn Budd cars plying the once-manicured trackage, a great railroad plant now redundant.
$25.00
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